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The Traditional Architecture Group of the Royal Institute of British Architects was founded in 2003 in response to the growing number of architectural practices and architects in Britain that were bui...
The Traditional Architecture Group of the Royal Institute of British Architects was founded in 2003 in response to the growing number of architectural practices and architects in Britain that were building traditional buildings. It was clear that the cause of traditional architecture could be well served by forming a group with the expressed aim of promoting traditional architecture both within the profession and within the wider community. The TAG Constitution states:

“The aims of the society are to celebrate the highest achievements of the past as a living source for modern inspiration. The group seeks to work within architectural, planning and educational disciplines to promote the values of a traditional approach in architecture and design. The group will provide mutual support, a meeting point and a venue for the exchange of ideas for those individuals interesting in or practicing contemporary traditional architecture. Additionally, we also aim to support the diversity of individuals and correlated trades dedicated to supporting the knowledge of craft and design values associated with traditional architecture.”

Many people today yearn for a better quality of environment in their cities, towns and countryside. All too often, where changes do occur, the results represent a degradation of what was there before. We need to learn how to reshape our built environment in a way that reflects the desires and values of the community.

Traditional architects understand that buildings of the past are uniquely capable of satisfying people’s needs. In the past buildings were designed to be beautiful as well as well as functional. Architects were schooled in a tradition that had evolved over millennia - one that totally integrated the practical and aesthetic requirements of buildings.

Despite a century of mechanisation traditional skill and knowledge have never lost and some architects in Britain and elsewhere continued steadfastly to practise and develop traditional architecture. The members of this Traditional Architecture Group are heirs to this continuity.

Traditional architecture teaches us that by seeking to create and to recognise beauty we establish a contact with our own sense of humanity – a humanity that is shared by all. Traditional architecture comes in many different styles and forms, for it is produced by many different individuals and cultures and so variety is an essential aspect of it. But whatever its origins it is always accessible to all.

Traditionalists believe that, however much the times we live in might be subject to change, there are basic human values which do not change. Our values in respect of the built environment are an example of this. This is clear for when we look at great architecture of one hundred, five hundred, two thousand years ago its power is undiminished.

The Traditional Architecture Group is committed to developing the values established by long tradition and adapting them to the modern world. Traditionalism looks to the past only to see the future more clearly. In the new century traditional architecture is growing worldwide. Traditionalism is the solid, viable, long term future for architecture.

  1.   Organisations
  2.    Public
The Scottish Civic Trust was set up in 1967, to help people connect to their built heritage and take a leading role in guiding its development. In its infancy, it successfully campaigned for the resto...
The Scottish Civic Trust was set up in 1967, to help people connect to their built heritage and take a leading role in guiding its development. In its infancy, it successfully campaigned for the restoration of Edinburgh’s New Town, was instrumental in the revitalisation of New Lanark and can also claim credit for bringing Doors Open Days to the United Kingdom.

Through supporting amenity groups, the Trust’s original objectives were:

- Well-informed public concern for the environment of town and country
- High quality in planning and in new architecture
- The conservation and, where necessary, adaptation for re-use of older buildings of distinction or historic interest
- Knowledgeable and therefore effective comment in planning matters
- The elimination of ugliness, whether resulting from social deprivation, bad design or neglect

Broadly speaking, we are still working towards the same objectives today.

We have a small staff team that works hard to achieve our objectives, working under the guidance of our Board. Everything we do centres around the following core values:

- We are robust and independent in advocating for Scotland’s places and spaces
- We are positive about the future of the built environment
- We lead thinking on Scotland’s civic spaces
- We collaborate across the heritage sector and beyond to develop ideas that tackle exclusion
- We support community groups looking after their locality

We are proud to represent Scotland’s civic sector and strive to ensure our amenity groups are active, empowered, and educated to make a difference in their locality.

We are fortunate to own our own eighteenth century townhouse in Glasgow, where we have maintained our offices since 1995. To celebrate 25 years of calling Tobacco Merchant’s House home, the Trust launched its “Written in Stone” campaign on 12th October 2020. The campaign seeks to establish a capital fund to cover the cost of future major repair works and ensure the preservation of this historic gem and the many stories held within its walls. We invite all with a passion for Scotland’s buildings and civic movement to contribute to the Written in Stone campaign by leaving a gift in their Will to protect the Tobacco Merchant’s House for future generations.
  1.   Organisations
  2.    Public
Everyone has driven or walked past a forlorn and unloved historic building at some time. You may have wondered why it isn’t being used or why someone doesn’t do something with it. The answer is often ...
Everyone has driven or walked past a forlorn and unloved historic building at some time. You may have wondered why it isn’t being used or why someone doesn’t do something with it. The answer is often complex and the solutions equally so. It takes a special group of people to identify a way forward and restore these buildings to the benefit of the community.

Scottish Historic Buildings Trust (SHBT) is a dynamic and innovative charity that does just that. It is dedicated to regenerating significant historic buildings for the benefit of others throughout the whole of Scotland.
  1.   Special Interest Group
  2.    Public
Our History - The Scottish Ironwork Foundation is a registered charity which promotes historic architectural ironwork made or found in Scotland. Scotland has lost a great deal of its industrial her...
Our History - The Scottish Ironwork Foundation is a registered charity which promotes historic architectural ironwork made or found in Scotland.

Scotland has lost a great deal of its industrial heritage - entire industries have been wiped away without any physical trace.

With the establishment of Carron in 1759, the light castings industry boomed and developed into the mid-19th Century to a point where Scotland was a global player inthe sector, its goods highly prized and names like the Saracen Foundry of Walter Macfarlane and Co, Mcdowall Steven’s Milton Ironworks, the Sun Foundry of George Smith and Co, David King and Sons, Mackenzie Moncur and the Lion Foundry of Kirkintilloch, became global brands. The collapse of the industry after WW2 led to these former glories being forgotten, buildings demolished, patterns destroyed, thousands of hours in design and drawing lost or even worse burned.

A slim thread of knowledge persisted amongst a few enthusiasts and this grew in the 1990’s as urban renewal projects and parks started to have their features restored or even replaced. The survival of company archival information is incredibly poor - for some firms all we have left are structures themselves, or if we are very lucky a trade catalogue. The market was global and some firms seemed to have delivered little work at home. What is most exciting is that when we think we have found everything whether it be archival or structures, out of the blue will come an email from Brasil or South Africa saying ‘we have found a small diamond mark on the ironwork that looks like it says ‘Glasgow’ - then we are off on another adventure...

The scale and reach of Scotland's influence in the manufacture and export of architectural ironwork is only starting to be fully understood. Hundreds of firms exported everything from railings to fountains, lampposts to railway stations, gutters to cast iron palaces.

Who We Are - The Scottish Ironwork Foundation came into being in 2002 as the result of a Millenium Fellowship grant to study Scottish Architectural Ironwork. We realised quickly that whilst some of us had been studying the subject for some years, the profile and understanding of what Scotland had contributed globally to this industry was not well understood.

We set out to change that and six Trustees built a database of Scottish iron structures across the world, reaching just under four thousand items. The site grew and became the place to consult for information on this remarkable industry.

Sadly our site was hacked in 2012, but thanks to a grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund in December 2013 we have been able to commission a new website and searchable database.

If you know of any examples of Scottish ironwork near you please get in touch! You can email us at [email protected].
What we do

We record, research and make publically available ironwork made or found in Scotland on our database. We take public contributions, help provide advice on identification of structures and provide additional information. We collect information relating to the firms undertaking this type of work in Scotland and undertake research projects to add to the corpus of knowledge.

We will provide advice to public and private bodies where we are able. We have the best collective archive of trade catalogues for these firms in the world, and an extensive knowledge base that supports our activities. We share this information primarily via this website but also through publications, seminars, conferences and the general press. We will sometimes get involved in rescuing objects or structures where it falls within our remit.

We can undertake research and provide archival information to support conservation and restoration projects on a fee basis to support our charitable purpose - please get in touch.
  1.   Courses and Training
  2.    Public
The Scottish Lime Centre Trust (SLCT) was established in 1994 as a ‘not for profit’ organisation registered as a charity in Scotland. Our aims and objectives are to: - Promote for the public benefi...
The Scottish Lime Centre Trust (SLCT) was established in 1994 as a ‘not for profit’ organisation registered as a charity in Scotland. Our aims and objectives are to:

- Promote for the public benefit the appropriate repair of Scotland's traditional and historic buildings;
- Advance education through the provision of advice, training and practical experience in the use of lime for the repair and conservation of such buildings and
- Promote and further the preservation and development of Scottish building traditional, crafts and skills.

Scottish Lime Centre Trust is a charity registered in Scotland No: SCO22692.
  1.   Windows and rooflights
  2.    Public
Selectaglaze is particularly passionate about the importance of retaining the finest examples of our architectural heritage through the listing process. But preserving a past does require sensitive in...
Selectaglaze is particularly passionate about the importance of retaining the finest examples of our architectural heritage through the listing process. But preserving a past does require sensitive interventions that enable the buildings to meet the changing needs of owners and ensure a sustainable future.

How does secondary glazing help windows in heritage and Listed buildings? - Windows generally have thermally inefficient single glazing and draughty, ill-fitting frames that provide little security and poor acoustic performance. With the thoughtful retrofitting of discreet secondary glazing, all these performance elements can be improved.

Can secondary glazing be used in Listed and historic buildings? - The various national heritage bodies have responsibility for managing the historic environment, so will advise local planning authorities and government departments on development proposals that can significantly affect Listed buildings or conservation areas. In most cases secondary glazing is fully accepted by Conservation Officers as a reversible adaptation i.e it can be removed, if required, at a later date with almost no impact on the original fabric of the building apart from repair of fixing holes and some redecoration. When designed carefully the original windows remain unaltered and aesthetically uncompromised.

It is often asked if secondary glazing will help with condensation and various other questions.

Do I need Listed Building Consent for secondary glazing? - Listed Building Consent is required for any alterations that would affect an area of historic significance and it is a criminal offence to carry out these works without consent. If you wish to carry out any work on a Listed building you will require Listed Building Consent through your local authority. If the building is in a conservation area, then advice should be obtained from a Conservation Officer at your local planning authority.For further details please check the planning portal

Listed Building Consent Assistance - Selectaglaze has a wealth of experience in providing secondary glazing for Listed buildings and helps by offering:

The widest available selection of frame styles allowing sympathetic designs to be developed for windows of all shapes and sizes
Bespoke joinery sub frames where required to provide discreet interfaces with surrounding structure
Frames that can be finished in almost any colour to closely match the existing decor

Selectaglaze can assist with preparation of a consent application for a fee. All windows are surveyed, and drawings prepared to accompany the application but no guarantee can be given on consent.
  1.   Architectural Metalwork
  2.    Public
Shepley Engineers was founded in the late 1940s and has been working in highly regulated environments, delivering projects to the highest quality standards, ever since. We have developed our breadth o...
Shepley Engineers was founded in the late 1940s and has been working in highly regulated environments, delivering projects to the highest quality standards, ever since. We have developed our breadth of services through both acquisition and organic growth and now operate in the Nuclear Engineering and asset care, Decommissioning and decontamination, and Restoration and renovation sectors.

Restoration and Renovation - Shepley became established as a specialist restoration and conservation contractor in 1985 when we completed a major iron project on the Grade 1 listed Dorchester Hotel on Park Lane, London. Since that time we have been engaged as the specialist contractor on numerous large high profile restoration schemes as well as a vast array of smaller private commissions.

  1.   Stained Glass
  2.    Public
Sherriff Stained Glass Specialists are a family run company with over 25 years’ experience in stained glass windows and leaded windows. We take care in the advice we give and the work that we carry ou...
Sherriff Stained Glass Specialists are a family run company with over 25 years’ experience in stained glass windows and leaded windows. We take care in the advice we give and the work that we carry out, using traditional techniques and skills for every project we undertake across the UK and Europe.

Our services include:

- Stained Glass Windows, Repair & Restoration
- Stained Glass Doors
- Leaded Windows, Repair & Restoration
- Window Frames, Guards & Restoration
- Secondary & Triple Glazing
- Conservation DGU’s
- Leaded Window & Stained Glass Courses

Sherriff Stained Glass Specialists offers a fully flexible service from design to fitting of stained glass and leaded windows. View examples of our recent work, including historic and modern buildings, Grade 1 and 2 listed houses and churches with beautiful stained glass windows and more.

We have the knowledge and ability to conduct all aspects of lead window conservation and restoration, and are fully comfortable to work alongside the main contractor on large building projects.

From full refurbishment of existing glass and design of a new stained glass window, to a single window repair– all our quotations are free and completely without obligation.

Learn more about Sherriff Stained Glass Specialists and get in touch using our contact form, call 01202 882208 or email [email protected] to learn more.
  1.   Special Interest Group
  2.    Public
Our mission is to safeguard, enhance, and promote Shetland's heritage, ensuring it is accessible to be enjoyed by all. Shetland Amenity Trust constantly strives to preserve and enhance everything t...
Our mission is to safeguard, enhance, and promote Shetland's heritage, ensuring it is accessible to be enjoyed by all.

Shetland Amenity Trust constantly strives to preserve and enhance everything that is distinctive about Shetland's cultural and natural heritage, promoting access to it whether physical or intellectual.

The Trust was created in 1983 and has since delivered an extensive range of high quality heritage and culture projects, in partnership with a range of local, national and international agencies.

We continue to be pro-active in seeking new opportunities and identifying new funding sources, to further enhance the heritage and culture experience for local Shetland people and visitors to our islands.

We are part of a community which takes great pride and pleasure in our cultural and natural heritage, embracing traditions, dialect and our physical environment in all of our activities.
  1.   Stonework & Masonry
  2.    Public
Welcome to Shields Stonework & Restoration Ltd. We are a small to medium business based in Surrey. We operate throughout the Greater London area, as well as the South and South-East of England. The...
Welcome to Shields Stonework & Restoration Ltd. We are a small to medium business based in Surrey. We operate throughout the Greater London area, as well as the South and South-East of England.

The majority of our works is within the commercial and public sector including historic buildings monuments, Grade Listed buildings and churches.

Shields Stonework & Restoration has a wealth of experience in the repair, restoration and installation of both internal and external stonework and brickwork. We specialise in internal and external façade conservation and restoration.

Our management team has many years' experience within the construction industry and we pride ourselves on our knowledge of a wide variety of construction processes in addition to our expertise in stonemasonry, including specialist decorative techniques such as Keim painting.

Our client base includes a host of major contractors and our working relationships have brought us to projects for English Heritage, local councils, and private and historic buildings.

  1.   Museums
  2.    Public
Sir John Soane’s Museum is the extraordinary house and museum of the British architect Sir John Soane (1753-1837). On this page, discover the history of the Museum, its founder and its world class col...
Sir John Soane’s Museum is the extraordinary house and museum of the British architect Sir John Soane (1753-1837). On this page, discover the history of the Museum, its founder and its world class collections.

Sir John Soane was one of the foremost architects of the Regency era, a Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy, and a dedicated collector of paintings, sculpture, architectural fragments and models, books, drawings and furniture.

Born in 1753, the fourth son of a bricklayer, his father’s professional links with architects and his own natural talent for drawing won him the opportunity to train as an architect. A talented and hard-working student, Soane was awarded the Royal Academy’s prestigious Gold Medal for Architecture, as a result receiving a bursary (funded by King George III) to undertake a Grand Tour of Europe. His travels to the ruins of Ancient Rome, Paestum and Pompeii would inspire his lifelong interest in Classical art and architecture.

Soane’s inventive use of light, space and his experimentation with the forms of Classical architecture earned him great success as an architect. During his career he won numerous high-profile projects, including the Bank of England (where he was architect for 45 years) and Dulwich Picture Gallery, and created his own extraordinary home and Museum on Lincoln’s Inn Fields.

His successes as an architect and his fascination with the history of architecture let to his appointment as Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy in 1806. Already an enthusiastic collector, he began to repurpose his home at Lincoln’s Inn Fields as a Museum for students of architecture.
The buildings

Today, Sir John Soane’s Museum occupies three buildings, Nos 12, 13, and 14 Lincoln’s Inn Fields. Sir John Soane acquired and rebuilt each of these buildings during his lifetime.

In 1792, Soane bought No. 12, at that time a 17th century house which he demolished and rebuilt as his home and office. Close to the Bank of England, of which he was Architect, the Royal Academy (then at Somerset House) and the coaching inns on High Holborn, the property was a convenient location for Soane as both a home and an office. In 1807, now Professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy, Soane bought and moved into No. 13, the house next door, creating a larger architectural office and what is today the Dome Area, which he filled with his rapidly expanding collections, and renting out the front of No. 12. In late 1823, he acquired No. 14, which he demolished and rebuilt in 1824-25, designing a new Picture Room as an extension to No. 13 to house his expanding collection of paintings.
The Museum

With a collection containing thousands of objects ranging from Ancient Egyptian antiquities and Roman sculpture to models of contemporary buildings, Soane’s house had become a Museum by the time of his death. He acquired some spectacular items, including the sarcophagus of the Egyptian pharaoh, Seti I.

The organisation of the Museum can at first glance seem crowded and even chaotic. However, it is, in fact, purposeful, with each interior being a work of art in its own right. Soane was constantly arranging and rearranging the collection, not just to incorporate new acquisitions, but to enhance the objects’ poetic qualities through creative and inspiring juxtapositions. In the Model Room, for example, Soane placed models of his own works beneath models of the ancient ruins that inspired them.

In 1833, Soane negotiated a private Act of Parliament: to preserve his house and collection, exactly as it was arranged at the time of his death, in perpetuity – and to keep it open and free for inspiration and education. Upon his death in January 1837, a Board of Trustees took on the responsibility of upholding Soane’s wishes – as they continue to do today.

Today, this unique house attracts more than 100,000 visitors a year. We hope that they enter curious and leave inspired – as our Founder intended
  1.   Stonework & Masonry
  2.    Public
We operate broadly as four departments, namely Building Conservation; Sculpture & Decorative Arts; Monumental Brasses; and Traditional Plasterwork. In each case we are well versed in conservation wor...
We operate broadly as four departments, namely Building Conservation; Sculpture & Decorative Arts; Monumental Brasses; and Traditional Plasterwork. In each case we are well versed in conservation work in the purest sense – where preservation of historic fabric and its authenticity are of the utmost importance – and in restoration work using traditional materials and practices merged where appropriate with the best of modern materials and methods.

Skillingtons are experienced main contractors, with projects to date being carried out in excess of £1M in value.

We are also happy to work as sub-contractors and have an excellent working relationship with many leading building firms throughout the country. In addition we frequently work with private clients too.

Since first starting we have regularly worked for English Heritage, the National Trust, The Churches Conservation Trust, the Historic Royal Palaces Agency and numerous Local Authorities.

The company has a commitment to training and actively seeks apprentices and trainees to work alongside our more experienced craftsmen and women, either for placements or permanent positions. The company is CITB registered.

Skillingtons are listed on ICON’s Conservation Register and Dr David Carrington, founder and Managing Director, is an accredited Conservator-Restorer (ACR).

Skillington Workshop Limited was established back in 1997. Now with around 25 employees Skillingtons is one of the country’s leading building conservation and restoration firms.
  1.   Building Surveyors
  2.    Public
We are a local, family run chartered surveying practice which means every enquiry, survey and client is an individual to us. When you work with us you will have direct contact with a local surveyor wh...
We are a local, family run chartered surveying practice which means every enquiry, survey and client is an individual to us. When you work with us you will have direct contact with a local surveyor who will help guide you through the house buying process.

We undertake building surveys on a variety of houses, but as the name suggests our passion and expertise lays in period and listed properties. We offer the RICS home survey standard products namely the Level 3 Building Survey and Level 2 Homebuyer report, but we also give bespoke reports for our listed building surveys, defect reports and damp and timber surveys.

All of our building surveys and homebuyer reports include:

- Over 100 pictures per report. This helps us convey defects to our clients as 'a picture paints a thousand words'.
- Roof survey conducted via drone. Traditional surveys are carried out from the ground/on a ladder. Through the use of drones and pole cameras we are able to fully see every angle of your roof/chimneys/gutterings. *in some areas there are flight restrictions and we will use a 10m pole camera*
- Thermal imaging to seek hidden moisture issues, where indicated.
- Thermo-hygrometer readings to assess moisture conditions throughout the property, sub-floor vents etc, again to help find hidden moisture issues.

We are passionate about providing a high level of service by ensuring our clients receive precise, simple to use information that is beneficial. We avoid the usual jargon and get straight to the point.

We can offer face to face appointments on-site to help you make decisions that are specific and useful to your needs. We are uniquely placed with surveyors in Wiltshire, Berkshire and London which means that we can easily serve the surrounding counties of Hampshire, Dorset, Somerset, Devon, Oxforshire Gloucestershire.

All our surveyors are trained to the highest standards with degrees in Building surveying, Historic Conservation and Project Management. We are industry accredited through the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Chartered Institute of Buiding (CIOB), the Residential Property Surveyors Association (RPSA) and we are members of the Society of Protection of Ancient Buildings, given our obvious passion and interest in historic buildings and Building Surveying. Joe, our newest recruit lives in Twickenham, South West London and Chris is based in Richmond Upon Thames. Steve, one of the founders is based in Woodcote which is nestled in the Chiltern Hills AONB between Oxford and Reading. We also have Dave Smith down in the West country in the medieval city of Salisbury, with the knowledge vault of the company Lawrence a bit further West on the Dorset boarder in a beautiful Vilage called Tisbury, just outside the Cranborne Chase AONB. Lastly we have Sarah who is always moving but currently resides just outside Basingstoke. Please get in touch and have a no-obligation discussion.
  1.   Organisations
  2.    Public
Our Mission “The encouragement, advancement and furtherance of the study and knowledge of the antiquities and history of this and other countries.” The Society of Antiquaries of London Royal Ch...
Our Mission

“The encouragement, advancement and furtherance of the study and knowledge of the antiquities and history of this and other countries.” The Society of Antiquaries of London Royal Charter (1751).

Our Values - Fellowship, Conservation, Research and Dissemination

The Society of Antiquaries of London is an educational charity that promotes understanding of the human past and recognises distinction in this field through election to its Fellowship.

The Society was founded in 1707 and today our 3,000 Fellows include many distinguished archaeologists and art and architectural historians holding positions of responsibility across the cultural heritage. The Fellowship is international in its reach and its interests are inclusive of all aspects of the material past.

As a registered charity (207237), the Society’s principal objectives are to foster public understanding of that heritage, to support research and communicate the results and to engage in the formulation of public policy on the care of our historic environment and cultural property.

We support those charitable objectives on a daily basis through our Library and Museum collections (at Burlington House and at Kelmscott Manor), through our conservation and research grant awards, our programme of events (lectures and seminars), communications such as publications, our website and our e-newsletter.

The Society of Antiquaries receives no direct support from public funds.

Our Strategic Objectives

- To conserve and develop the research and educational potential of the buildings, collections and library at Burlington House and Kelmscott Manor and to make these resources more accessible to Fellows and the wider public.
- To engage, enthuse and foster the Fellowship and staff in pursuing the aims of the Society to further our understanding of the past and influence the heritage sector and the general public.
- To ensure the Society remains fit to meet its objectives now and in the future.
  1.   Organisations
  2.    Public
Founded in 1780 and incorporated by Royal Charter in 1783 the Society’s purpose is “to investigate both antiquities and natural and civil history in general, with the intention that the talents of man...
Founded in 1780 and incorporated by Royal Charter in 1783 the Society’s purpose is “to investigate both antiquities and natural and civil history in general, with the intention that the talents of mankind should be cultivated and that the study of natural and useful sciences should be promoted.”

The Society of Antiquaries of Scotland is proud to be an inclusive, anti-racist, pro-equality and pro-diversity heritage charity. We believe that no one holds a monopoly on Scotland’s history and that it should be shared by and for everyone. For over 240 years, we have provided expertise, support and resources to enhance and promote the understanding and enjoyment of Scotland’s past around the world. We facilitate research and innovation, advocating as an independent voice for heritage matters, and sharing knowledge of the past with everyone; we are committed to working towards equality and accessibility in the Scottish heritage sector and beyond.

The antiquities that society members, like Sir Walter Scott and Alexander Rhind, originally collected, form the basis of the collection at the National Museums of Scotland (NMS), having been gifted to the nation by the Society in the mid nineteenth century.

Two hundred years on we continue to promote the understanding and conservation of Scotland’s historical and archaeological environment for the benefit of all. Today we are an independent charity stimulating discussion and collaboration and supporting research.

Increasingly we’re involved in helping to translate the past for a contemporary audience, highlighting its relevance today. We publish high quality books and peer reviewed papers, run an annual programme of lectures and conferences (such as the prestigious Rhind Lectures) and administer research grants and prizes.

We also act as advocates for the heritage sector, responding to government consultations and chairing meetings and symposia. We are an impartial voice for Scotland’s past and a focal point for its diverse strands.

The Society is governed by a voluntary Council and run by a small staff. It is mainly funded by membership subscription with several thousand Fellows spread around the world all connected through their interest in Scotland’s past.

  1.   Organisations
  2.    Public
The SAI brings together the world’s leading architectural artists, illustrators, model makers, animators and photographers - dynamic, progressive, professionals who bring architecture to life. Members...
The SAI brings together the world’s leading architectural artists, illustrators, model makers, animators and photographers - dynamic, progressive, professionals who bring architecture to life. Members of the SAI work in all disciplines and for architects, developers and designers in all industry sectors. The society uses the full spectrum of techniques from time-honoured traditional methods, including watercolour and pencil to the latest cutting-edge CGI technology, photo-real imagery and animation.
  1.   Special Interest Group
  2.    Public
Churches, chapels and burial grounds are familiar landmarks to us all. They make up the greater part of our rich ecclesiastical heritage. Rural churches, ruined monasteries, cathedrals and suburban pl...
Churches, chapels and burial grounds are familiar landmarks to us all. They make up the greater part of our rich ecclesiastical heritage. Rural churches, ruined monasteries, cathedrals and suburban places of worship - all are witness to our complex religious and social past. The archaeological study and conservation of ecclesiastical buildings and their contents - including monuments, stained glass, bells and furnishings - as well as burial grounds, earthworks and landscapes, provide a unique insight into our past. This precious and often fragile legacy is increasingly under threat. The Society for Church Archaeology was formed in 1996 to provide a focus for all who are interested in promoting the care, conservation and study of the ecclesiastical buildings and landscapes of Britain and Ireland.

The Society for Church Archaeology aims to promote the study of churches and other places of worship, along with their associated monuments and landscapes, and publicises the results of the latest research and discoveries in its journal and newsletter. The society also works to ensure recoginition of archaeological aspects of church conservation, contributes to the preservation and management of sites and buildings, and complements the work of existing organisations by acting as a specific and all-inclusive focus for church archaeology.
  1.   Horticulture
  2.    Public
The organisation was founded as the Garden Design Society by a group of eminent landscape designers, who came together to establish garden design as a serious profession. The Society now boasts a dive...
The organisation was founded as the Garden Design Society by a group of eminent landscape designers, who came together to establish garden design as a serious profession. The Society now boasts a diverse Membership of both individual designers and practices. They are all experienced, competent, creative professionals, who have gone through a robust process of accreditation and abide by our Code of Conduct, and they work across a broad range of projects from roof terraces and urban courtyards to large country gardens and public parks.

The Society also promotes best practice and continuing professional development through its conferences, workshops and seminars, its Journal and the annual SGD Awards. It represents garden designers within the wider horticulture and landscape industry on important issues, as well as engaging with the public to raise the profile of garden design.
  1.   Builders
  2.    Public
At Solid Bond Solutions we take your problems and make them ours. We are a construction company specialising in facade restoration, refurbishment and maintenance as well as internal refresh and fit ou...
At Solid Bond Solutions we take your problems and make them ours. We are a construction company specialising in facade restoration, refurbishment and maintenance as well as internal refresh and fit out works.

With offices in the North West, North East and South of England we are able to deliver fast, dynamic and comprehensive solutions on a national scale in both planned and reactive maintenance works and surveys.

Having gained a vast array of experience in such sectors as hospitality, commercial office, education as well in the banking and rail sectors. We pride ourselves in offering exceptional service through meticulous planning and execution of our works to bring about safe, coherent and cost effective solutions.
  1.   Archaeology
  2.    Public
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